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How To Get Rid Of Bad Woodworking Projects

Are you frustrated by something you poured your heart and soul into that did not turn out as you had hoped? Or do you have a bad woodworking project lying around that you want to get rid of? Carpentry is not an easy skill, and even the most skilled woodworkers have their off days. Such is life!

Don’t fret if you have a bad woodworking project on your hands. As with most things, there are several solutions you can follow to get rid of your bad woodworking project. Find the one that works best for you!

1. Fix it.

If you have a bad woodworking project, why not try and make it into a good one? Chances are that you or someone you know put a lot of time and effort into the project. If effort was lacking, of course, that might be the reason for the poor quality.

Some woodworking projects are not as far gone as you might imagine. Perhaps all that you need to do is replace an off-cut board, and your project will look as good as new.

Another suggestion you can try is to use some paint or finish. Wood that is covered in blemishes can be covered up with paint, for instance. You can also use plastic wood to help you cover up any bigger mistakes, and paint over this afterwards.

Of course, your project might be beyond saving, but why not give the old college try at fixing it up?

2. Dismantle it.

Wood is typically very expensive to buy. If your bad woodworking project is beyond saving, it might be time to cut your losses. Try saving as much of the wood as you can, if the wood can be saved.

You can often repurpose this wood for another project in the future. Having some spare wood around the house can always come in handy for odd jobs and quick fixes.

3. Sell it.

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure, as they say! Perhaps you can get rid of your bad woodworking project by selling it. People’s definition of quality is extremely different, depending on who you ask. Perhaps the mismatched doors and uneven top of your coffee table are exactly the sort of ‘rustic charm’ that someone might be looking for.

Feel free to post your woodworking project on your local buy and sell website. Kijiji is a great place to start, but you can also use social media websites such as Facebook to help you with this. Don’t go overkill with your asking price, as you are likely trying to get rid of something that isn’t worth as much as a well-built piece.

When you post anything for sale online, be sure to include lots of pictures and an accurate description. If there are any serious defects that people should be aware of, you should tell them. Being dishonest is not going to do you much good if the person shows up to buy your table and it’s nothing like what you said it would be!

4. Burn it.

You might find that your woodworking project is beyond saving, and that nobody is interested in buying it. At this point you might consider burning the project.

Wood is highly flammable, after all, and you might get some enjoyment from watching the project go up in flames. Burning the project might also provide you with a welcome release, if you built the project and it did not go according to plan.

Whenever you are burning anything, make sure it is properly contained. You might need to dismantle the wood first to make it into a size that will fit into your bonfire or woodstove. The last thing you want is a fire you cannot control!

As a note, you should avoid burning a woodworking project that has been coated with paint, finish, or any other kind of chemical. Burning these chemicals releases toxic gases into the air that harms both you and the environment.

5. Smash it.

One of the greatest releases for getting rid of something you are unhappy with is through demolition.

Let’s say your nightstand did not turn out nearly as well as you had hoped. While this fact might be frustrating, do not despair! You can get rid of your frustrations and have a little fun in the process.

Grab your nearest hammer and go to town on your nightstand. You might even want to use a sledgehammer! If you can safely do so (without endangering you or anyone else), you might also try dropping your woodworking project off of a cliff or a tall roof to watch it smash below. Always make sure to clean up any mess afterwards, of course!

6. Curb it.

If you do not feel like selling your project or following any other of the suggested solutions, you can always try putting your project to the curb. You never know who might pick it up!

Remember that not everyone can afford to buy their own furniture. You might be doing someone a huge favour by putting a piece of furniture on the curb for someone to pick up. Someone might genuinely enjoy the piece, or you might see a student looking to get something new for their living room.

7. Hide it.

Is your project about to fall apart? If not, why not consider hiding it somewhere in your home?

You can always use an extra storage shelf in your basement, for instance. If your bad woodworking project is structurally sound, bring it somewhere that it won’t often be seen and put it to a new use. Stack old paint cans on it, or try organizing your tools or gardening supplies.

8. Gift it.

Maybe your son or daughter brought home a ‘jewelry box’ that they made in their shop class. Despite its title, it actually looks nothing like a box, and it does not seem fitting to hold valuable jewelry. Why not try passing it along, then?

Keep in mind that many people hold strong sentimental ties to material goods, even if they are of a poor quality. Your child’s grandparents might treasure that jewelry box more than any other jewelry box in the world. If you have an appropriate person in mind who might enjoy the gift, consider giving it to them today!

Bad woodworking projects can be a nuisance, especially if you have to get rid of them. Fortunately for you this is not an impossible process, and there are many steps that you can follow. You might even make some money in the process! At the very least, you might make someone’s day. Use whatever solution works best for you, and move on with your life.

About the author

Nicole Harding

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