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How to Get Rid of Gnats

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How to Get Rid of Gnats

How to Get Rid of Gnats

Gnats are very much in need of a public relations department. Actually, a gnat could be one of several different small flying insects that are related in those biology classifications. The most common are called fruit flies (Learn how to get rid of fruit flies) and some types are called fungus gnats or vinegar flies. Regardless, they are always pests. They are completely harmless in every way except that they are one of the most annoying insects on the planet. They tend to buzz around our heads, clumsily bouncing off of our faces and occasionally get into our ears. The gnat has an average life span of around four months. It would be a very rare and unusual thing to see just one gnat flying around. This is because they spend most of those four months laying eggs. Each gnat can lay between two hundred and three hundred eggs during its life.

Most gnats love the smell of rotten food. It’s their main choice as a place to eat and to lay eggs. This is why you see them so often around your trash cans and sink drains. Most likely they are busy laying eggs there. They also seem to like over-watered plants. Since they really do not serve any practical purpose, are pests, and you’re reading this guide; you most likely want to get rid of them. The best way to get rid of gnats is to not let them come around in the first place. If you cover you trash cans, wash out you sink, and don’t leave dirty dishes in the sink, you shouldn’t have to worry about them. Also make sure not to over water your plants. If somehow, despite all your preventive measures, you still have gnats inside your home, there are several ways to go about getting rid of them.

  • Nuke Them. This is a good choice if you just have a few that wander in from outdoors. Just about any flying insect spray will kill them and very quickly. If the situation becomes an infestation, a fogger might be a better way to get the job done. If you use a spray and have pets make sure that you check the labels, and follow all directions for safe use. A less caustic approach would be to use insecticidal soap sprays.
  • Track Them and Kill Them. If you’ve got a swarm, you need to eliminate the source. It seems gnats are attracted to vinegar. Fill a jar almost to the top with vinegar, poke several small holes in the lid and then set it out. The gnats will come to the jar, wiggle down into the hole, and will not be able to climb back out. Set several of these traps around your home and monitor them to determine where the highest concentration is and use that information to find the source. Understand that the gnats that pester you in your home require moist or wet organic material in which to breed – it could be anything from a grimy drain to the drip pan under your refrigerator. Check your door and window seals also – they could be breeding right outside and wandering in.

There are other home remedies that have met with success, but most of them use vinegar, and work pretty much like the vinegar trap above. Mixing a half cup of vinegar and a tablespoon of Dawn dish detergent attracts the gnats. They will feed on the mixture and die. Apple cider vinegar and baking soda works also. Be careful with this one. Vinegar and baking soda react and foam up, so make your mixture slowly. A cup of ammonia poured down the kitchen sink can also encourage the little pests to go elsewhere.

Gnats are harmless pests, and like many such household pests, the best way to get rid of them is to prevent them from coming around in the first place. It takes just a bit of protective sanitation to take away their breeding grounds. Also, most commercial flying bug sprays will wipe them out with little or no trouble. For more information regarding this article, read how to exterminate gnats.

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Please Leave Comment Below

 
  • h johnson

    Call Orkin, pay money.Better yet, call Obama to save you.

  • Jimbo

    Using bleach toilet tablets kept them from hanging around the bathrooms since it cut off their water source. Before there were always at least a few flying in the toilet bowl when using the bathroom.

  • Evellyn

    Well I didnt have any jars, so I used a clear glass and a piece of foil on top and punched some holes in that. Lets hope this works!

  • Josh

    Not a tip but a cry for help. I have a Ferret and the problem now lies with her. Originally the gnats came in with some fruit from the grocers. Now they are nesting in her needless to say…the litter box. I have tried fly strips and caught several on them. However many i can and kill there’s too many. I used Raid flying insect killer and I got a lot of them killed but still too many left that it didn’t kill. I clean her litter-box daily and scrubbed every part of her cage hope just hoping it would get rid of the problem but still no. Ive tried the vinegar and soap but not a single gnat has gone near it they actually stay away from it more so.

  • Linda

    Where do you hang the plastic bags with the water in it? When I first read about this, it sounded like hang it in the middle of the door way. I know we dont leave our doors open. hummm inside door ways? possible I guess. tx for info.

  • BreBre

    Does it have to be “dawn dish soap” ONLY? Or can it be any dish detergent?

  • Didi

    I tried the apple cider vinegar mixed with 4 drops of liquid dish soap and it had the gnats swimming within 1 hour. I think it caught about 30 of them. Just use a regular clear tall glass with the mixture above, about 2 ounces of apple cider vinegar and it should work. They were attracted to some bananas left out but hopefully this will kill them ALL by tomorrow! Thanks for the tip :)

  • Charlie

    Bleach all of your drains. Put bread and fruits in the fridge, and wipe down surfaces. Take out trash daily, and no dirty dishes in the sink or dishwasher.

  • Winnie

    Well I live out in the country so I use the plastic baggies, at first it didn’t work but when I hung it near my doors and windows the sunlight’s reflection seemed to mirror a spider web. So I think that’s why they stay away.

  • Esther

    It seems like the only permanent solution is re-pot your plants with fine, high-quality potting soil. Here are things I tried: 1. Watering less frequently. Gnat population was reduced, but they never went away. 2. Replacing topsoil with sand. Gnats came back within a couple weeks. 3. Vinegar and dish soap traps. Killed some but not nearly all of the gnats. But I still keep a little bowl of the stuff next to my plants to keep things under control. 4. Water plants with highly diluted Windex solution. Got rid of the gnats most effectively, but nearly killed my plants. I’m just going to have to wait until spring, and wash and re-pot all of them. :(


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